St. George The Great Martyr

30 11 2007

ST. GEORGE THE GREAT MARTYR

St George was born about 280 A.D. of noble birth. He joined the Emperial guard of the emperor, Diocletian, as a teenager. He even served along side of Constantine, who was also in the emperial guard. St. George was stationed in Libyia, North Africa. There was a town close by where a huge dragon tormented and devoured the people. This town was surrounded by thick walls but the dragon’s breath would even kill people. Each day two animals were thrown to the dragon. Then when the animals were gone, they drew lots whose child would be offered. The lot fell to the king’s daughter. She was dressed in royal robes of white to meet the dragon. St. George heard about what was going to happen, so he rescued her from the dragon and tied the dragon up. He told the people that if they would turn to Christ, he would kill the dragon. They agreed, so the dragon was slain.

Now Diocletian hated Christians. He felt he was annointed by the pagan gods to wipe out Christianity. He made a proclamation that all the churches would be closed and the scriptures destroyed. All those in rank as officers that were Christians would be demoted. Moreover, all other people would become slaves. St. George had a stand off with Diocletian where he ripped up the proclamation. He was put in prison. A beautiful young woman was placed in his cell to tempt him. Before the night was over , she asked St. George to baptize her. Next, Diocletian had St. George tied to a wheel with spokes and razors. This did not kill St. George. A tube of water was filled with lime to encase St. George. He survived. They gave him poison. However, St. George made the sign of the cross and didn’t die. Diocletian had St. George’s hands tied behind his back and then made him drink poison. Nevertheless, St. George used his head to make the sign of the cross and survived. Lastly, George was beheaded. St. George is described as a steadfast, triumphant, victorious warrior. He is the patron saint of soldiers and captives.

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